Differences Between field Study and Survey Research Methodology

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Differences Between field Study and Survey Research Methodology

Field studies and surveys are two common research methods in psychology that involve collecting data from participants. Here are some key differences between field studies and survey research:

  • Type of data collected: Field studies involve collecting data through observations or interactions with participants in their natural environment, while surveys involve collecting data through self-report measures, such as questionnaires or interviews.
  • Level of participant involvement: Field studies typically involve more intensive participant involvement, as the researcher may be observing or interacting with participants over an extended period of time. Surveys, on the other hand, typically involve less intensive participant involvement, as the researcher is typically collecting data through self-report measures rather than through direct observation or interaction.
  • Control over variables: Field studies generally have less control over extraneous variables, as the research is conducted in the natural environment of the participants. Surveys, on the other hand, may have more control over extraneous variables, as the researcher can carefully control the conditions under which the data are collected.
  • Generalizability of results: Field studies may be more limited in terms of the generalizability of their results, as the sample may not be representative of the larger population. Surveys, on the other hand, maybe more generalizable, as the sample can be carefully selected to be representative of the larger population.
  • Data collection methods: Field studies typically involve collecting data through direct observations or interactions with participants, while surveys typically involve collecting data through self-report measures such as questionnaires or interviews.
  • Time and resources required: Field studies generally require more time and resources to conduct, as they involve observing or interacting with participants over an extended period of time. Surveys, on the other hand, may be quicker and less resource-intensive to conduct, as they typically involve collecting data through self-report measures.
  • Ethical considerations: Field studies may involve more intensive participant involvement and may raise ethical concerns if the researcher is collecting sensitive or personal information from participants. Surveys may involve fewer ethical concerns, as the researcher is typically collecting data through self-report measures rather than through direct observation or interaction. However, surveys may still raise ethical concerns if they involve sensitive or personal information or if they place an undue burden on participants.

Overall, field studies and surveys are two common research methods in psychology that have different strengths and limitations. Researchers should carefully consider which research method is most appropriate for their specific research question and goals.

BPC-003 Solved Assignment Research Methods in Psychology


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