Burial Practices In Early Civilizations

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Burial Practices In Early Civilizations

Burial practices in early civilizations varied widely, depending on the culture and the time period. Some of the earliest civilizations, such as those in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, developed highly sophisticated funerary rituals and practices, while others, such as the nomadic peoples of the steppes, had simpler burial customs.

Ancient Egyptians believed in an afterlife and had elaborate funerary rituals and burial practices. They buried their dead in elaborate tombs, often accompanied by grave goods, such as jewellery, tools, and food, to provide for the deceased in the afterlife. The tombs were designed to protect the body from decay and to deter grave robbers. The body was embalmed, a process of preserving the body for long periods of time, and mummified, a process of desiccating the body, this was believed to be necessary for the afterlife. The most famous of all Egyptian tombs is the Great Pyramid of Giza built for the pharaoh Khufu (Cheops) and his queen around 2550 BCE

In Ancient Mesopotamia, burial practices were also influenced by the belief in an afterlife. The Sumerians and Akkadians buried their dead in underground chambers, often accompanied by grave goods, such as jewellery and pottery. In some cases, the bodies were buried with a ritual offering of food and drink, to provide for the deceased in the afterlife.

In other early civilizations, such as the Indus Valley Civilization, little is known about specific burial practices. The Harappan civilization which existed around 2600-1900 BCE, buried their dead beneath the floors of their houses, or in small cemeteries. It is uncertain what sort of rituals, if any, accompanied these burials.

Other early civilizations such as the ancient Chinese civilization and ancient Greece civilization also had elaborate funerary rituals and practices. The ancient Chinese civilization buried their dead with offerings such as jade, weapons and ceramics, the tombs were also decorated with sculptures, paintings and inscriptions, meant to ensure the deceased’s comfort and protection in the afterlife. In ancient Greece, funeral processions were accompanied by offerings of food, wine, and other goods, and the body was usually cremated, and the ashes were placed in an urn and buried.

Nomadic peoples had simpler burial customs, usually burying their dead in the ground, or in simple graves. They were often buried with weapons, ornaments and other personal belongings. Some nomadic people practiced sky burials where they would leave the body out in the open for vultures to consume, this was considered a way of returning the body to the earth and letting the elements purify it.

In conclusion, burial practices in early civilizations varied widely depending on the culture and time period. Some civilizations such as ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia had elaborate funerary rituals and practices, while others, such as nomadic peoples, had simpler burial customs. Many early civilizations believed in an afterlife and their funeral rituals were shaped by this belief, the purpose of these rituals was to ensure the deceased’s comfort and protection in the afterlife.

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